Friday, October 26, 2012

Lead Standard for OMB Review

Publication Date: 10/26/2012
• Publication Type: Notice
• Fed Register #: 77: 65415-65416
• Title: Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Lead in General Industry Standard

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 208 (Friday, October 26, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65415-65416]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-26412]


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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Office of the Secretary


Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB
Review; Comment Request; Lead in General Industry Standard

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sponsored information
collection request (ICR) titled, "Lead in General Industry Standard,"
to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval
for continued use in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)
of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.).

DATES: Submit comments on or before November 26, 2012.

ADDRESSES: A copy of this ICR with applicable supporting documentation;
including a description of the likely respondents, proposed frequency
of response, and estimated total burden may be obtained from the
RegInfo.gov Web site, http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain, on the
day following publication of this notice or by contacting Michel Smyth
by telephone at 202-693-4129 (this is not a toll-free number) or
sending an email to DOL_PRA_PUBLIC@dol.gov.
    Submit comments about this request to the Office of Information and
Regulatory Affairs, Attn: OMB Desk Officer for DOL-OSHA, Office of
Management and Budget, Room 10235, 725 17th Street NW., Washington, DC
20503, Fax: 202-395-6881 (this is not a toll-free number), email:
OIRA_submission@omb.eop.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Contact Michel Smyth by telephone at
202-693-4129 (this is not a toll-free number) or by email at DOL_PRA_PUBLIC@dol.gov.

    Authority: 44 U.S.C. 3507(a)(1)(D).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose of the Lead in General Industry
Standard and its information collection requirements is to protect
workers from the adverse effects associated with occupational exposure
to lead. Employers must monitor exposure to lead, provide medical
surveillance, train employees about the hazards of lead,
and establish and maintain accurate records of worker exposure to lead.
Employers, workers, physicians, and the Government use these records to
ensure exposure to lead does not harm workers.
    This information collection is subject to the PRA. A Federal agency
generally cannot conduct or sponsor a collection of information, and
the public is generally not required to respond to an information
collection, unless it is approved by the OMB under the PRA and displays
a currently valid OMB Control Number. In addition, notwithstanding any
other provisions of law, no person shall generally be subject to
penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if the
collection of information does not display a valid Control Number. See
5 CFR 1320.5(a) and 1320.6. The DOL obtains OMB approval for this
information collection under Control Number 1218-0092. The current
approval is scheduled to expire on October 31, 2012; however, it should
be noted that existing information collection requirements submitted to
the OMB receive a month-to-month extension while they undergo review.
For additional information, see the related notice published in the
Federal Register on August 10, 2012 (77 FR 47882).
    Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB,
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the address shown in
the ADDRESSES section within 30 days of publication of this notice in
the Federal Register. In order to help ensure appropriate
consideration, comments should mention OMB Control Number 1218-0092.
The OMB is particularly interested in comments that:
     Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency,
including whether the information will have practical utility;
     Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the
burden of the proposed collection of information, including the
validity of the methodology and assumptions used;
     Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the
information to be collected; and
     Minimize the burden of the collection of information on
those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate
automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection
techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting
electronic submission of responses.
    Agency: DOL-OSHA.
    Title of Collection: Lead in General Industry Standard.
    OMB Control Number: 1218-0092.
    Affected Public: Private Sector--businesses or other for-profits.
    Total Estimated Number of Respondents: 56,947.
    Total Estimated Number of Responses: 3,807,618.
    Total Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 1,105,397.
    Total Estimated Annual Other Costs Burden: $143,191,684.

    Dated: October 22, 2012.
Michel Smyth,
Departmental Clearance Officer.
[FR Doc. 2012-26412 Filed 10-25-12; 8:45 a.m.]
BILLING CODE 4510-26-P
 
Visit National Safety Compliance to obtain training resources to comply with OSHA Lead Standards. 

Monday, October 22, 2012

Outreach Webinar on GHS Standard

On August 13, OSHA and the Society of Chemical Hazard Communication (SCHC) hosted a free webinar to help employers understand the requirements of OSHA's revised Hazard Communication Standard in the United States. The archived presentation has now been viewed by more than 8,000 participants. Developed as part of OSHA's alliance with SCHC, the webinar explained changes to the Hazard Communication Standard to align with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). During the webinar, OSHA staff provided information that answered questions from chemical manufacturers, downstream users, and other interested parties. Topics included changes expected in training, labeling, and safety data sheets and compliance assistance opportunities.
To access the webinar, click https://goto.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1006847 and submit your e-mail address and information (if needed). You will receive a link with instructions on viewing the presentation or downloading the reference materials. To learn more about the revised Hazard Communication Standard and GHS,visit us online at www.osha-safety-training.net

Friday, October 12, 2012

OSHA's Fall Prevention Campaign

FALLS ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN CONSTRUCTION. In 2010, there were 264 fall fatalities (255 falls to lower level) out of 774 total fatalities in construction. These deaths are preventable.
Falls can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps:
  • Plan
  • Provide
  • Train
OSHA has partnered with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) - Construction Sector on this nationwide outreach campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers about common fall hazards in construction, and how falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved. Here's how:
PLAN ahead to get the job done safely
When working from heights, such as ladders, scaffolds, and roofs, employers must plan projects to ensure that the job is done safely. Begin by deciding how the job will be done, what tasks will be involved, and what safety equipment may be needed to complete each task.
When estimating the cost of a job, employers should include safety equipment, and plan to have all the necessary equipment and tools available at the construction site. For example, in a roofing job, think about all of the different fall hazards, such as holes or skylights and leading edges, then plan and select fall protection suitable to that work, such as personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).
PROVIDE the right equipment
Workers who are six feet or more above lower levels are at risk for serious injury or death if they should fall. To protect these workers, employers must provide fall protection and the right equipment for the job, including the right kinds of ladders, scaffolds, and safety gear.
Different ladders and scaffolds are appropriate for different jobs. Always provide workers with the kind they need to get the job done safely. For roof work, there are many ways to prevent falls. If workers use personal fall arrest systems (PFAS), provide a harness for each worker who needs to tie off to the anchor. Make sure the PFAS fits, and regularly inspect all fall protection equipment to ensure it's still in good condition and safe to use.
TRAIN everyone to use the equipment safely
Falls can be prevented when workers understand proper set-up and safe use of equipment, so they need training on the specific equipment they will use to complete the job. Employers must train workers in hazard recognition and in the care and safe use ladders, scaffolds, fall protection systems, and other equipment they'll be using on the job.
OSHA has provided numerous materials and resources that employers can use during toolbox talks to train workers on safe practices to avoid falls in construction. Falls from ladders, scaffolds and roofs can be prevented and lives can be saved through three simple steps: Plan, Provide and Train.